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Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards

What are the Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards?

Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) is transitioning to Maryland’s College and Career-Ready Standards (MDCCRS). These standards have been developed from the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). The standards define the skills and knowledge students need to be successful in the workplace and postsecondary education, ensuring that students receive a high quality education. The Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) adopted the Common Core State Standards in June 2010.

After adopting the standards for English/Language Arts and Mathematics, Maryland began revising the state curriculum to align with the new standards. The new curriculum was accepted in 2011 and is being implemented in the current 2013-2014 school year. The goal of Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards is to assure that children leave school with the real-world skills and knowledge they need to succeed in college and/or their careers.

Maryland has included the following areas of focus in its new curriculum:
-English/Language Arts
-Mathematics
-Pre-K
-Literacy in History/Social Studies
-Literacy in Science and Technical Subjects
-Braille

What Parents Need to Know

The focus of the Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards (MDCCRS) is for students to complete college and be well-equipped for their career.  To ensure a smooth transition into the MDCCRS, the following information has been provided for parents:

Top 10 Things Parents Need to Know about the Maryland College and Career-Ready Standards




Backpack Guide for English/Languages Arts and Literature              

What’s Changing?

What to Look for in the Backpack?

What Can Parents Do?

Students will be reading more non-fiction in each grade level.

Look for students to have more reading assignments based on real-life events, such as biographies, articles and historical stories.

Read non-fiction books students. Find ways to make reading fun and exciting.

Reading more non-fiction texts will help students learn about the world through reading.

Look for students to bring home more fact-based books about the world. For instance, first-grade students might read Clyde Robert Bulla’s A Tree is a Plant. This book lets students read and learn about science.

Know what non-fiction books are grade-level appropriate and make sure students have access to these books.

Students will read challenging texts very closely.

Students will have reading and writing assignments that might ask them to retell or write about key parts of a story or book.

Provide more challenging texts for students to read. Show students how to dig deeper into difficult pieces.

When it comes to writing or retelling a story, students will use “evidence” gathered from the text to support what they say.

Look for written assignments that ask students to draw on concrete examples from the text that serve as evidence. Evidence means examples from the book that students will use to support a response or conclusion.  This is different from the opinion questions that have been used in the past.

Ask students to provide evidence in everyday discussions and disagreements.

Students will learn how to write from what they read.

Look for writing assignments that ask students to make arguments in writing using evidence.  For fourth- and fifth-grade students, this might mean reading and writing about The Kids Guide to Money, a non-fictional book by Steve Otfinoski.

Encourage writing at home. Write using evidence and details.

Students will have an increased academic vocabulary.

Look for assignments that stretch a student's vocabulary and teach them that "language is power."

Read often to babies, toddlers, preschoolers, and children.

Backpack Guide for Mathematics             

What’s Changing?

What to Look for in the Backpack?

What Can Parents Do?

Students will work more deeply in fewer topics, which will ensure full understanding.

Look for assignments that require students to show their work and explain how they arrived at an answer.

Know what concepts are important for students based on their grade level and spend time working on those concepts.

Students will keep building on learning year after year, starting with a strong foundation.

Look for assignments that build on one another. For example, students will focus on adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing. Once these areas are mastered, they will focus on Algebra. Parents should be able to see the progression in the topics students learn.

Know what concepts are important for students based on their grade level and spend time working on those concepts.

Students will spend time practicing and memorizing math facts.

Again, look for assignments that build on one another, as described above. Parents should be able to see the progression in the topics they learn.

Be aware of what concepts students may have struggled with last year and support them in those areas moving forward.

Students will understand why the math works and be asked to talk about and prove their understanding.

Students might have assignments that focus on memorizing and mastering basic math facts, which are important for success in more advanced math problems.

Help students know and memorize basic math facts. Ask students to “do the math” that pops up in daily life.

Students will now be asked to use math in real-world situations.

Look for math assignments that are based on the real world. For instance, homework for fifth-grade students might include adding fractions as part of a dessert recipe, or determining how much pizza friends ate based on fractions.

Provide time every day for your child to work on math at home.



Partnership for Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers

The Partnership for Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is a consortium of 24 states, including Maryland, to develop an assessment system that aligns with the new standards (CCSS).  The assessments will be computer-based and will utilize a variety of constructed response items, performance-based tasks, and computer-enhanced, computer-scored items to measure higher-order skills such as critical thinking, communications and problem solving.

Even though the new standards have been implemented for the current 2013-2014 school year, the PARCC assessments will not be administered to students until the 2014-2015 school year. The assessments are currently in a full field testing, research and data collection stage. For the current year, students will be assessed using the Maryland School Assessments (MSA) until they are replaced with the PARCC assessments in the 2014-2015 school year.


Parent Roadmaps are designed to help parents understand how the new standards will affect their individual child at each grade-level and suggest ways to help their student succeed. Below are Parent Roadmaps for English/Language Arts and Mathematics at each grade-level.

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What Students Need to Know

English/Language Arts and Literature Shifts

Shift

What Will Students Have to Do?

Read as much non-fiction as fiction

Read more non-fiction
Understand how non-fiction is written and put together
Enjoy and discuss the details of non-fiction

Learn about the world by reading

Learn more about science and social studies through reading
Use “primary source” documents
Get smarter through the use of texts

Read more challenging material

Re-read until comprehension
Read books both at and above comfort level
Handle frustration
Keep pushing to improve

Talk about reading using evidence

Find evidence to support arguments
Form judgments and opinions
Discuss what the author is thinking
Make predictions about what will happen next

Write about text using evidence

Make arguments in writing using evidence
Compare multiple texts in writing
Learn to write well

Know more vocabulary words

Learn words necessary for a successful college experience and career
Get smarter at using the “power of language”

Mathematic Shifts

Shift

What Will Students Have to Do?

Build skills across grade levels

Keep building on learning year after year

Learn more about less

Spend more time on fewer concepts

Use math facts easily

Go more in-depth on each concept

Think fast and solve problems

Spend time practicing by doing lots of problems on the same idea

Really know it, really do it

Make the math work, and understand why it does
Talk about why the math works
Prove that they know why and how the math works

Use math in the real world

Apply math in real world situations
Know which math skills to use in which situations

Partnership for Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers

The Partnership for Assessment and Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) is a consortium of 24 states, including Maryland, to develop an assessment system that aligns with the new standards (CCSS).  The assessments will be computer-based and will utilize a variety of constructed response items, performance-based tasks, and computer-enhanced, computer-scored items to measure higher-order skills such as critical thinking, communications and problem solving.

Even though the new standards have been implemented for the current 2013-2014 school year, the PARCC assessments will not be administered to students until the 2014-2015 school year. The assessments are currently in a full field testing, research and data collection stage. For the current year, students will be assessed using the Maryland School Assessments (MSA) until they are replaced with the PARCC assessments in the 2014-2015 school year.

 

 
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