Members of the Board of Education XVI took the oath of office Monday during a swearing-in ceremony held St. Charles High School. Five new Board of Education members, Mark Crawford, Victoria Kelly, Margaret Marshall, Virginia McGraw and Barbara Palko, were elected in November to their first term in office and join incumbents Jennifer Abell and Michael Lukas, who were re-elected.

The Board members serve a four-year term and elect officers at the January meeting. Board members Patricia Bowie, Maura Cook, Pamela Pedersen and Roberta Wise did not run for re-election.

  • Abell is the Director of the March of Dimes for Southern Maryland and a long-term resident of Charles County. She was first appointed to the Board in 2004, and re-elected to her third term this year.
  • Crawford is a teacher and extended care director at Southern Maryland Christian Academy. Elected in November, Crawford previously served a four-year term as a member of the Board of Education from 2002 to 2006.
  • Kelly is a management consultant and program analyst for EHS Technologies and an active parent and community volunteer. She is newly elected.
  • Lukas is an engineer at the Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division and volunteers with several community organizations. He was elected to a second term.
  • Marshall is a former government remediator, assistant test coordinator, social studies teacher and county instructional resource teacher for social studies who retired from the office of curriculum and instruction after 25 years of service with Charles County Public Schools. She is newly elected.
  • McGraw is a retired Charles County Public Schools principal who also served as a teacher and vice principal during her 25-year career with Charles County Public Schools. She is newly elected.
  • Palko is a retired career and technology education coordinator who also served as a teacher and instructional specialist during her 35-year career with Charles County Public Schools. She is newly elected.
  • Georgia Benson is the appointed student member of the board. She is a senior at Westlake High School, where she serves a member of the student government association, Key Club and the National Honor Society. She also plays varsity field hockey and lacrosse.

Benson and St. Charles High student liaison Paris Mercier officiated the swearing-in ceremony where Clerk of the Charles County Circuit Sharon Hancock administered the oath of office to each member.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

 

Roberta S. Wise, former chairman of the Board of Education of Charles County, was recently named as the first recipient of the James E. Richmond Leadership Excellence Award. The award was established in 2013 to honor school system leaders who exhibit the standards of leadership and excellence demonstrated by Richmond during his career. Richmond spent his entire 47-year career in education with Charles County Public Schools, and served four terms as superintendent. Wise was presented with the award by Superintendent of Schools Dr. Kimberly Hill at the Dec. 9 Board meeting.

In her comments about the award, Hill said Wise’s service to the school system has epitomized the phrase be the difference. “Great leaders lead by example. Mrs. Wise has shown that she is willing to put in the work to accomplish whatever task is at hand. She is a visible and vocal advocate for public education,” Hill said during the award presentation.

Wise served two four-year terms on the Board of Education, from 2006 to 2014, and was chairman for the last five years of her time on the Board. Wise said she was honored to be chosen for the award. “I am so honored to have received an award in the name of former Superintendent James Richmond, whom I have great respect for. I give all of the credit for my leadership skills to the many outstanding people I have worked with and been mentored by over all of my years in education,” Wise said.

During her time on the Board, Wise was well known for her leadership. Hill said not only did Wise have a solid understanding of herself and the ability to handle difficult decisions, but she is an excellent communicator. “Mrs. Wise knows how to reach a variety of people in many different ways to build consensus. She communicates with strength and with humor, always advocating the needs of our students,” Hill said during the award presentation.

Prior to her election to the Board in 2006, Wise worked for Charles County Public Schools as a mathematics teacher at Henry E. Lackey High School, a mathematics resource teacher at the system level and as a coordinator of the Educational Partnership Team. During her teaching career, she received the Charles County Public Schools Teacher of the Year award, and was honored by the Washington Post as a recipient of the Agnes Meyer Outstanding Teacher Award in 1991. Wise retired in 1999.

The idea behind the award came from former longtime Board of Education member Col. Donald Wade, who served on the Board with Wise and passed away earlier this year. Wade introduced the award as a way to honor outstanding school system leaders and to honor Richmond for his service to Charles County Public Schools. Wise just completed her second and final term on the Board and said she considers being chosen for the award as a highlight of her career. “This award highlights what service to children is all about – being the difference for them and believing in them is what counts,” she said.

A plaque naming Wise as the first recipient is on display near the boardroom at the Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, which houses Charles County Public Schools administrative offices.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

 

 

 

Imagine finding out your location, directions, maps and history from a tiny device on your eyeglasses. Westlake High School senior Robert Spruill, III, and sophomore Travil Greene have a business plan to create it and they recently pitched the idea in their business and financial literacy class.

Welcome to the Wolverine Bank Tank, Westlake’s version of the popular television show, “Shark Tank.” Created by business education teacher Adrian Carroll, the format provides students with an opportunity to present products and ideas to a panel of judges.

More than 75 Westlake students presented ideas and products to a panel of judges at the first Wolverine Bank Tank. The judges spent time judging student ideas and business plans from Dec. 8 through Dec. 10. The Bank Tank was composed of several administrators from Charles County Public Schools and Charles County government as well as business executives from national and local companies including Sam’s Club, Chick-Fil-A and Elena’s Deli restaurant.

Participating students are enrolled in business and financial literacy classes at Westlake and spent the past couple of months refining their products and developing business plans. During the three-day event, students headed to the school auditorium and spent three minutes pitching a product or idea to the Wolverine Bank Tank.

Spruill and Greene said the presentation experience was nerve racking but extraordinary. Others, like senior Rose Sciarratta, felt confident in front of the judges and her peers. Sciarratta came up with the idea to create a thought recorder. The recorder, when connected to Wi-Fi, would upload daily thoughts, including the time, location and date of the thought.

Both Spruill and Greene aspire to be businessmen. “This assignment has made me realize to never be scared to express your ideas and who you are,” Spruill said. “You have to remember that it is also extremely important to be smart with your money and investments,” Greene added. Sciarratta plans on starting her own business after high school. “I meet with close friends all the time to discuss business opportunities,” Sciarratta said.

Carroll plans to expand the event for the second quarter and incorporate prizes for the top three products/ideas. “My belief was that each student walked away with a better understanding of how the real business world works, and each of them understands what it takes to research and develop products to be pitched to potential buyers or investors. Also, the project demonstrates the importance of public speaking and what methods to use to get up and deliver a powerful and well thought out presentation,” said Carroll.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

General Smallwood Middle School seventh grader Shawn Jenkins earned the chance to participate in a unique academic development program this past summer. He attended the National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Explore STEM program held at Occidental College, located in Los Angeles, from June 28 through July 3. The six-day program introduces high-achieving middle school students to innovative and rewarding academic experiences and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, as well as the medical field.

While attending the program, Jenkins learned how to apply engineering design processes to program robots, analyze the influence technology has on sustainability and green communities, and worked with professionals in STEM-related careers as part of a real-world simulation in which a fictional town sustained growth. Program participants also created personal success plans in which they outlined academic options for high school to help them better plan for their future.

Jenkins was nominated to attend the program by one of his science teacher’s at Smallwood, Holly Fallica. The STEM summer program, sponsored by Envision, is for middle-school students only. Participants are either nominated by a teacher or community member, or can choose to enroll themselves to attend. There are costs associated with program participation, and Envision provides scholarship opportunities for students who wish to attend.

Envision is an education organization dedicated to enabling students of all ages to explore their interests and gain learning experiences beyond the classroom. Envision sponsors several programs for students at the elementary-, middle- and high-school levels, as well as college students. These programs range from the medical field, digital media and law to youth leadership and business.

For more information on Envision programs available to students, visit http://www.envisionexperience.com/explore-our-programs.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

 

North Point High School junior Kaitlyn Freeland was nominated and attended the National Youth Leadership Forum (NYLF): Medicine held July 12-17 at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. The program provides students interested in careers in the medical field with opportunities to have hands-on experiences and learn about technology used in medical facilities. Participants also take part in lectures and small-group seminars with medical students, physicians, surgeons and biomedical researchers, which provide them with a comprehensive view of the medical field.

As part of the nine-day forum, students also examine diagnostic tools and future medical specialties. Participating institutions range from the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) and The George Washington University Hospital to the Boston University School of Medicine and Harvard Medical School. The forum is sponsored by Envision, an education organization dedicated to enabling students of all ages to explore their interests and gain learning experiences beyond the classroom.

The medical forum is reserved only for students who demonstrate leadership skills and an interest in medicine. In order to be eligible for the program, students must be in grades 9-12 and nominated by a teacher or school administrator.

Freeland is enrolled in the health occupations program at North Point and was nominated to attend the forum by her health occupations teacher, Jill Bodamer. Freeland plans to major in neuroscience after she graduates and hopes to attend the University of Minnesota. Envision sponsors several programs for students at the elementary-, middle- and high-school levels, as well as college students. These programs range from the medical field, digital media and law to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), youth leadership and business.

For more information on Envision programs available to students, visit http://www.envisionexperience.com/explore-our-programs.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

North Point High School senior Abrianna Broomes was nominated and attended the Medical Institute held July 21-27 at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. The program provides students interested in careers in the medical field with opportunities to learn about the medical field, and participate in hands-on learning experiences. The program features topics such as human anatomy and physiology, microbiology and infectious diseases, surgery, cancer and biomedical ethics.

Participants also work in the gross anatomy lab and with a patient simulator to focus on current medical issues, such as preventative medicine and heart disease. Students are also able to use surgical box simulators, practice dissection and taking blood pressure, work in the suture lab and with Georgetown Medical students and professors.

Broomes plans to study nursing at Stevenson University after she graduates from North Point, and applied to participate in the Institute last school year. Interested students must submit an online application, a personal statement about why they want to attend the program and provide their guidance counselor with a form to complete on behalf of their application.

The Medical Institute is an eight-day long program and Georgetown sponsors four sections for students to choose from annually during the summer. Other topics covered include introduction to alternative medicine, intensive-care unit (ICU) medicine, emergency medicine and trauma surgery. Participants also take part in lectures and small-group seminars with medical students, physicians, surgeons and biomedical researchers, which provide them with a comprehensive view of the medical field.

Georgetown hosts several summer programs for interested high school students, some of which can be completed for college credit. More information is available on the Georgetown University website at http://scs.georgetown.edu/departments/21/summer-programs-for-high-school-students/home.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

 

The new Board of Education will be sworn into office at 4 p.m., Monday, Dec. 15, at St. Charles High School in Waldorf. The ceremony will be held in the auditorium and is open to the public.

Five new Board of Education members were elected into office last month. They are Mark Crawford, Victoria T. Kelly, Margaret T. Marshall, Virginia R. McGraw and Barbara S. Palko. They join incumbents Jennifer Abell and Michael Lukas, who were re-elected to their positions. The Board begins a four-year term and elects of­ficers at its first meeting of the year, on Tuesday, Jan. 13.

The swearing-in ceremony will be streamed live on the Charles County Public Schools website, www.ccboe.com.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

Two Charles County Public Schools teachers, Laura Buzzell at Henry E. Lackey High School, and Deborah Simmons at Milton M. Somers Middle School, recently joined the ranks of accomplished teachers nationwide who achieved national certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS).

Both teachers completed a yearlong performance-based assessment series to become National Board Certified Teachers. The assessment is designed to measure what accomplished teachers should know and be able to do. The process requires teachers to demonstrate how their activities strengthen student performance and student achievement.

Buzzell and Simmons join 31 other Charles County Public Schools teachers who hold current national certification status. Buzzell is a mathematics teacher at Lackey and earned her certification in the area of young adulthood. She began her career with the school system in 2007 at Lackey and currently teaches Algebra I, Advanced Placement (AP) calculus and the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) course for juniors. Buzzell has a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and Spanish from Susquehanna University, and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from McDaniel College.

Simmons is a mathematics teacher at Somers and earned her certification in the area of mathematics/early adolescence. She began her career with Charles County Public Schools in 2002 at John Hanson Middle School, and has been teaching at Somers since 2005. Simmons teaches all of the seventh-grade accelerated math students. She has a bachelor’s degree in elementary education and mathematics from West Liberty State College, and a master’s degree in middle school curriculum and instruction from Virginia Polytechnic Institute.

National Board Certified Teachers must complete a rigorous review of their skills and work, which includes teacher portfolios, student work samples, videotapes, and thorough analysis of the candidates’ classroom teaching and student learning. Teachers also complete a series of written exercises that probe the depth of their subject-matter knowledge and their understanding of how to teach that material to students.

These teachers join more than 4,000 teachers nationwide who were certified in 2014. Certification is valid for 10 years, after which a teacher may complete the renewal process. Maryland has 2,760 teachers who are nationally certified and is one of the top 10 states with the highest participation in the certification process.

By achieving National Board Certification, Charles County teachers are eligible for a stipend added to their annual salary as long as they maintain their National Board Certification status. Only teachers with a standard or advanced professional certificate who have a minimum of three years successful teaching experience are eligible to apply for National Board Certification. Information about the application process is available on the NBPTS website at www.nbpts.org.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

The Board of Education honored five Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) employees during the Dec. 9 Board meeting, including Camille Calloway, Patricia Hodson, Bonnie Jenkins, Carrie Lamb and Timothy Remo.

Calloway is a special education teacher at Henry E. Lackey High School where she has worked for the last eight school years. As a special educator and department chair, she provides help and support to the students and staff at Lackey. Calloway’s extensive knowledge and dedication to her work set her apart from her peers. Her coworkers often seek her out when they need assistance, and Calloway is willing to assist anyone in need. In his letter of nomination, Lackey Principal James Short said Calloway exemplifies the best that Lackey has to offer. “No need is too small, no challenge too great for Ms. Calloway’s attention. When considering what’s great about Lackey, it begins with the kind and caring spirit of our staff,” Short wrote in his nomination letter.

Hodson is a media specialist at John Hanson Middle School and helped transform the media center into the hub of the school. She continuously enhances the media center both in accessibility and appropriate resources for students. She has purged over 3,000 books and old resources and replaced them with updated materials. She recently took a Spanish class at the College of Southern Maryland in order to better communicate with the school’s growing Spanish-speaking population. Hodson is described by her coworkers as extremely dependable, flexible, and willing to take on any duties. Hanson Principal Kathy Kiessling said Hodson is a valuable resource for students and staff. “Her friendly and supportive nature makes her approachable and it is evident that she enjoys what she does,” Kiessling wrote in a nomination letter.

Jenkins is a third-grade teacher at T. C. Martin Elementary School. She is the team leader for the third grade, participates on several committees and takes an active part in the leadership of the school. Jenkins’ consistent growth in the achievements of her students demonstrates that she has the qualities of a gifted teacher and is able to reach struggling students. She knows her students well and strives to support their well-being by working with their parents to ensure their children are successful. “Ms. Jenkins’ work ethic is outstanding. She is always organized and her lessons involve a great deal of thought and structure,” Martin Principal Greg Miller wrote in his nomination letter.

Lamb is an instructional resource teacher at Dr. Gustavus Brown Elementary School, where she has worked for the past four school years. She is dedicated to supporting and coaching teachers and assisting them in bringing out the best in their students. Lamb provides small group instruction and models lessons for teachers to use in the classroom. Her coworkers describe her as a valuable resource of information, and someone who is always willing to help where she is needed. In her letter of nomination, Brown Principal Christienne Warren describes Lamb as an integral part of the leadership team. “Ms. Lamb is always available to support teachers. She plans with them and answers questions. She never fails to do what it takes to help students succeed,” Warren wrote.

Remo is a fifth-grade teacher at C. Paul Barnhart Elementary School. He was recognized for his exemplary classroom management skills as well as being a leader in technology and instructional best practices. He researches current practices, trends, technology and information in order to provide the highest level of instruction and support for his students. He also has provided modeled lessons for his colleagues and teachers across the county. Remo is leading the way in integrating science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education to students by coaching the first robotics team for Barnhart. Troy Barnes, principal at Barnhart, said Remo provides support to his coworkers daily. “He is a leader in technology and frequently assists anyone in need. Mentor teachers frequently ask to schedule new teachers to visit his classroom,” Barnes wrote in his nomination letter.

The Board honors several exemplary employees each month.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

 

 

 

The Board of Education honored five students on Tuesday, Dec. 9 for excellence in academic achievement, career readiness and personal responsibility. Honored were Shana Cavanaugh, fifth grade, Dr. Gustavus Brown Elementary School; Paris Jones, fifth grade, C. Paul Barnhart Elementary School; Roman Lakner, fifth grade, T.C. Martin Elementary School; Michael Petschk, eighth grade, John Hanson Middle School; and Sarah Jones, junior, Henry E. Lackey High School.

Cavanaugh was honored by the Board in the area of academic achievement and is a responsible and respectful student. She always gives 100 percent in all aspects of learning, whether she is in her accelerated math class or her gifted reading group. Cavanaugh maintains straight A’s and is the recipient of numerous principal’s honor roll and personal responsibility awards. She is truly an asset to her school and considered by her teachers as a role model for other students.

Jones was honored in the area of academic achievement for several accomplishments. She has received all A’s and scored at the advanced level on the Maryland School Assessment (MSA) in both math and reading. Jones is an active student and also participates in both dance and the Girl Scouts. She plans on studying nursing after she graduates from school.

Lakner was recognized in the area of academic achievement and works hard to stay a full year above grade level in math. He is enrolled in gifted reading and writing classes and consistently earns principal’s honor roll awards. Lakner is a member of the math team, knowledge bowl team and the Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) team. His teachers describe him as an exemplary role model for his peers.

Petschk was recognized in the area of career readiness and is an honor roll student. He is currently taking all enrichment classes and is an active member of the Civil Air Patrol. Petschk holds certifications in emergency response training that allowed him to recently participate with an emergency services ground team to perform security detail during a crash investigation. He has also logged several flight  hours as a pilot  His goal is to fly solo in a glider next year and join the United States Air Force as a medic.

Jones was recognized in the area of personal responsibility and has earned straight A’s every year during her high school career. She is currently enrolled in and excels in five Advanced Placement (AP) classes. Outside of her studies, Jones has been the lead in school plays, and is a member of the chamber choir. Jones would like to pursue a career in medicine after she graduates.

Each month the Board of Education honors students for their success in academic achievement, career readiness and personal responsibility.

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,500 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.