•    In a special ceremony held Nov. 10, a group of 24 Westlake High School juniors and seniors received a white laboratory coat to honor their commitment to the Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Science Program. The ceremony was sponsored by Frank DiGiovannantonio, a local occupational therapist who wanted to recognize the student achievements and celebrate their pledge to advance in the biomedical field. Dr. Kerry Clark, a scientist with the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), spoke during the ceremony and encouraged the students to “dig deep into science and plan to get dirty along the way.” Westlake’s PLTW teacher Jean Benedetti, along with Christine Paul, a science teacher at Westlake, also congratulated the students during the ceremony on their commitment to a future in science.

•    Walter J. Mitchell Elementary School hosted a schoolwide Veterans Day ceremony on Friday, Nov. 11 to recognize school community family members who served in the Armed Forces. Students and staff dressed in red, white or blue and different grade levels represented different color groups. The ceremony included musical, oral and visual presentations to pay tribute to those who serve the United States. Among the more than 60 participants included Lawrence Abell, a retired lieutenant in the United States Navy and president of the Veterans Museum in Bel Alton. Abell provided remarks during the ceremony about the importance of remembering those who give their lives to protect freedom.

•    Berry Elementary School hosted an Evening of Learning event on Wednesday, Nov. 16 to provide parents with an opportunity to visit the school and learn about programs available for students. Sessions parents could attend included accelerated math, the new Words their Way vocabulary program, and strategies for comprehending and writing about text. Berry reading resource teacher Beth Sorsby helped to plan the event and said it was an important opportunity for parents to learn how to work with their children at home. “I hope that parents who attend the Evening of Learning leave with valuable strategies that will help to increase student knowledge and strengthen the home/school connection,” she said.

Berry Principal Sandra Taylor is in her first year of leading the school and spearheaded the effort to continue the Evening of Learning. “We get so many concerns from parents with regard to academics, particularly with the new math,” Taylor said. “We need to be able to come together [as a school community] for different reasons. This is a structured environment and academic-based, and is so important.” Also featured at the Evening of Learning was a Relay for Life basket auction. During the month of November, Berry students and staff participated in a basket-filling fundraiser. Each grade level chose a theme its basket and donated items to fill the basket. According the Berry fourth-grade teacher Corinne Clark, the school’s Relay for Life chairperson, the basket auction was a way for students and staff to work together for a worthy cause. “We wanted to do a fundraiser that students could be a part of. With the holiday season coming up, a basket auction seemed like a great opportunity to come together for a great cause,” Clark said.

•    Walter J. Mitchell Elementary School hosted a Grandparents/Special Persons’ Day on Tuesday, Nov. 22 and welcomed more than 500 participants to the school. Two, one-hour sessions were planned with students in intermediate grade levels welcoming families in the morning and primary grade level students visiting their families in the afternoon. Activities planned as part of the event include Thanksgiving bingo, story bracelets, several arts and crafts and the Roll a Grandpa game. Mitchell staff received positive feedback about the event from students and visitors.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

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The J.C. Parks Elementary School students and staff were honored last week by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through its Ocean Guardian School program. Parks is the first elementary school in Maryland to be recognized as an Ocean Guardian School for its efforts in conservation, protecting the environment, improving local watersheds and promoting green efforts. During a recognition ceremony held Nov. 21, student members of the Parks Green Team introduced some of the conservation efforts coordinated at the school and why it was important for them to be involved.

Under the direction of Parks science teacher Deanna Wheeler, the Green Team helps to maintain the wetlands and outdoor classroom area on the Parks campus, participates in the school’s Green Apple Day of Service, studies local watershed areas such as Mallows Bay and Chapman’s Landing and helps to place gabions, or fencing, used to help control erosion. In their science classes, students also helped to raise more than 400 yellow perch freshwater fish and released them in to the wild.

Wheeler encourages all students to give back to the environment. “We work on several projects to make sure we help protect the environment, improve watersheds. This is our second year in the program but our first banner year for meeting the requirements,” Wheeler said. During the ceremony, Green Team members gave a visual presentation about what happens to rain water collected at the school, and how it eventually leads to the ocean.

To receive recognition through NOAA’s Ocean Guardian program, schools must first apply and submit a community-based project as part of the application. The program supplies grant funding to help support conservation projects. Parks first received $4,000 in grant funds last school year to help with several environmentally driven projects at the school, such as a Wetlands Day and to support a solar powered fountain. Parks is in the second year of participating in the program, which is a program new Parks Principal Greg Miller fully supports.

“We have a very important mission. Research states kids who learn about science and taking care of the environment learn skills that are important for any future career field. Let’s continue our hard work and help each other learn,” Miller said. 

Samuel Orlando, a member of NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuary, presented Wheeler with an official Ocean Guardian School banner to honor the students for their efforts. Orlando also highlighted the overall goal of the program and said it ultimately benefits students by introducing them to learning through doing. “This program helps kids learn about environmental stewardship. Students learn through various hands-on activities, such as working in local watersheds and visiting National Marine Sanctuaries. Your school is also the first elementary school East of the Mississippi River to receive this recognition, and one of only two schools in Maryland,” he said.

The second Ocean Guardian School in Maryland is North Point High School, who was first honored last school year with a program banner for their environmental conservation efforts. North Point will be honored for meeting the program requirements for the second year in a ceremony planned for this afternoon at the school.

Grant funding is provided annually once Ocean Guardian Schools meet goals outlined in community service projects identified by the school. To learn more about the Ocean Guardian School program, visit http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/education/ocean_guardian/schools.html.

About CCPS

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

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Southern Maryland legislators expressed their support for education at the Board of Education’s annual legislative breakfast while learning about the school system’s economic impact and special education challenges.

“You are doing everything about right, right now,” said Senate President Thomas “Mike” Miller, who represents District 27 which includes part of Charles County. Miller said legislators are interested in raising the level of quality of teachers, and using the best teachers to focus on the kids with the highest needs. “That’s the future,” he told the Board and Superintendent.

The annual breakfast is a time for the Board of Education and Charles County’s legislative delegation to share information, concerns and educational issues before the Maryland General Assembly convenes in January.

Superintendent Kimberly Hill introduced a presentation showing the economic value of Charles County Public Schools (CCPS). “People always hear how education is a drain on taxpayers’ money, but what does that investment lead to?” Hill said. The study, conducted by Beacon, an independent research group from Salisbury University, shows CCPS is a major contributor to Charles County’s economy. Every $1 dollar from the CCPS operating budget that is spent and retained in the local economy results in total county spending of $1.81. CCPS makes an impact as the largest employer in Charles County, with nearly 2,375 of its 3,542 employees living in the county. Every CCPS job supports an additional .49 jobs in the local economy, according to the report.

The study also explores the economic value of academic degrees awarded and the impact CCPS has on reducing public costs while increasing economic development opportunities. A complete copy of the Beacon report can be found at http://www.ccboe.com/aboutus/fastfacts.php.

Hill directed the discussion to the increase in the number of special education students enrolling in CCPS. Hill said CCPS provides a pathway for students to careers and college, as well as offers a safety net for kids. Special education, she said, is one of those safety nets.

Amy Hollstein, deputy superintendent, explained the costs associated with providing services to both special education and non-English speaking students. “Last year, Charles County was No. 1 in the state for English Language Learners (ELL) coming into the school system.” Hollstein told the stories of three special education students, showing how different levels of services can cost between $14,699 per student for most special education students to $42,296 per special education student needing the highest level of care. The average operating cost per pupil for fiscal year 2017 is $13,490.

During the past five years, CCPS has enrolled 600 additional special education students with an increase of 200 more students this year than last year. Hollstein said the school system has managed the increased special education costs for the past several years, but the expenses are becoming greater than CCPS can handle in its existing operating budget.

Board Chairman Virginia McGraw reminded legislators that the Board and staff are available for consult on any education issue that might surface in the coming legislative session.

Members of the Charles County legislative delegation, including Miller, Sen. Thomas “Mac” Middleton, Del. Edith Patterson, Del. Susie Proctor and Del. C.T. Wilson, along with Charles County Commissioners’ President Peter Murphy and Commissioner Ken Robinson, attended the meeting with the Board of Education and staff.

About CCPS

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event. 
Legislative breakfast 2016

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Ashley Breads has dissected a heart and brain, she’s conducted an electrocardiogram — better known as an EKG — and has learned from Johns Hopkins physicians.

She’s a sophomore in high school.

With her eye on a surgical career, Breads is in the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) Biomedical Sciences program at Thomas Stone High School. It is one of the programs in Career and Technology Education of Charles County Public Schools (CCPS).

The biomedical class is “one of the classes I look forward to,” Breads said. “And the teachers are a big part of that.” Her CTE classes have allowed Breads a wider view of the medical landscape. “It opened my mind to how broad the medical field is,” she said. “I’ve been exposed to many different career fields.”

During a program held at the Waldorf West branch of the Charles County Public Library, CTE students in the program’s various fields spoke to county and state leaders about the importance of CTE and how it enriches a traditional education.

Riley Jedlowski, a senior at St. Charles High School, uses skills she has learned in PLTW Pathway to Engineering in other areas of her everyday life. “I’ve learned proper problem solving and brain storming that have shaped the way I think,” she said.

Like Breads, she appreciates CTE for guiding her toward a potential career path that suits her. “It allows you to guide yourself in the direction right for you,” Jedlowski said.

“Without it, I would go into a job I don’t like,” Lisette LaFontant, a North Point High School senior in the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute. “This is an amazing opportunity for students.” LaFontant said she will likely not pursue a career in fire safety. “But I gained some knowledge, connected with peers,” she said. “That is special to me.”

Lynne Gilli, assistant state superintendent of the division of career and college readiness for the Maryland State Department of Education, and Irene Padilla, assistant state superintendent of the division of library development and services with MSDE, along with other state officials, attended the CTE event — the ninth out of 24 that will be hosted in Maryland.

Gilli said Maryland has a national reputation for having a robust CTE program. In 1992, 14 percent of CTE students were both college and career ready. Now, the number has jumped to 61 percent, she said.

“We are at the forefront of preparing students,” Gilli said.

She was once in the shoes of CTE students, taking cosmetology classes while in high school and working at her mother’s salon while going to college part time. She was able to buy her first home at 25 and had no school loans.

“When you have to get up and make money, you look at work differently,” Gilli said.

CCPS Superintendent Kimberly Hill said students need a diploma, but they also need skills. Education is not simply academics, but learning to communicate, coordinate and work together toward achieving goals. “A work ethic cannot be discounted,” she said.

Learning to stick to a task, persevering through it, committing the time and energy to it are skills that can be found in all CTE programs and students, Hill said.

Currently, programs offered are Career Research and Development, Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute, PLTW Biomedical Sciences, PLTW Pathway to Engineering and Teacher Academy of Maryland (TAM). Starting in 2017, Business Management and Finance and Computer Science will be available.

Da’Juon Washington, a North Point senior and the Student Board Member to the Board of Education, is a TAM student. While his ultimate goal is to be the U.S. Secretary of Education, Washington knows he has to start somewhere.

“I want to be an educator,” Washington said. “I always wanted to make an impact in the field of education, and I got to start that journey while I was still in high school.”

CCPS and MSDE is partnering with the Charles County Public Library to host upcoming events to familiarize the public with CTE and its programs. All events will be held from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

There will be one Jan. 12 at the Potomac branch at 3225 Ruth B. Swann Drive in Indian Head; another Jan. 19 at the La Plata branch at 2 Garrett Ave. in La Plata; a meeting will be Feb. 2 at P.D. Brown Memorial Library at 50 Village St. in Waldorf; and on Feb. 9 at the Waldorf West branch at 10405 O’Donnell Place in Waldorf.

For more information about CTE programs, go to www.ccboe.com/cte/.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event. 

 

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Charles County Public School’s (CCPS) It’s Academic will be 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7 at Maurice J. McDonough High School. It’s Academic is a quiz competition testing the general knowledge of teams made up of three high schools students from each of the county’s seven public high schools.

The competition was originally slated for Thursday, Dec. 8. The winning team will advance to the televised version of the quiz set to air April 8 on NBC4.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event. 

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•    All schools and school system administrative offices will be closed Nov. 23-25 for the Thanksgiving holiday. Schools and offices reopen on Monday, Nov. 28. Visit the Charles County Public Schools website, www.ccboe.com, for the most up-to-date calendar information.
 
•    Henry E. Lackey High School is hosting the U.S. Navy Band Commodores, the Navy’s premier jazz ensemble, at 7 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 28. Admission is free and the concert is open to the public. The 18-member group is led by Senior Chief Petty Officer William C. Mulligan. Their performances feature a mix of traditional big band music, jazz vocal arrangements and new instrumental music written specifically for the Commodores. Visit http://www.navyband.navy.mil/commodores.html to learn more about the Commodores.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

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He was in fifth grade when Will Moten found out he could run fast. At recess, kids would race and he usually won. For a while, that was enough. Then a teacher asked if he wanted to run track. He had no idea what that was, but signed up with Charles County Elite Track & Field Club. “This could be something,” he remembered thinking.

Moten, now a senior at Westlake High School and holder of records in outdoor and indoor track, has been named a national finalist in the Wendy’s High School Heisman program. From a pool of more than 20,000 student athletes from around the country who excel not only at sports, but academics and community service, Moten is among the top 10 — five boys and five girls — in a heat for the final prize.

“It’s a pretty elite group,” Richard Borchers, president of the DavCo Restaurant, LLC, a Wendy’s franchisee, said. Borchers, who recently visited Westlake to surprise Moten with the honor, added seniors nominated for the award are go-getters.

“They are role models to their peers and community,” Borchers said. “They challenge themselves in and out of the classroom.”

Moten, known for his reserved character, comes alive on the track, helping Westlake win back-to-back state championships. “He’s a great young man,” said Beth Shook, Westlake’s track and field coach. “Will’s very dedicated to his sport, very studious.”

“Dedicated” and a “hard worker” are words that continue to spring up when his teammates describe Moten.

“He gets the job done when he needs to,” senior Tobias Hurley said.

“When he’s needed, he’s there,” said senior Thomas Alcorn, who is on the relay team with Moten. “He never lets us down.”

His parents, William Moten and Sylvia Bryant, describe their son in much the same way.

“He’s a leader and very humble,” Bryant said. “He doesn’t like a lot of attention, but he likes competition.”

William Moten didn’t even know his son could run that fast when he first started. Now there is no way to slow him down as he continues to college where Moten would like to study business administration and engineering. “He never wanted to be known just for track,” William Moten said. “He’s a strong worker.”

As a national finalist for the Wendy’s High School Heisman, Moten earned a $5,000 college scholarship and a trip to New York City for Heisman weekend in December. On Dec. 9, the two national winners will be announced during an awards ceremony which will be aired 8:30 p.m. Dec. 11 on ESPN2.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event. 

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The Charles County Department of Health expanded its initial investigation of a tuberculosis (TB) case involving an individual at La Plata High School after learning the person also frequents the Robert D. Stethem Educational Center after school hours. The school system has identified a small group of people at Stethem who may have had exposure to the individual.

The school system will begin emailing and mailing exposure letters on Nov. 18 to staff, parents of students and any others who are thought to have had extended contact with the diagnosed individual. If parents or staff members do not receive an exposure letter, they do not need to be screened at this time.

So far, the school system has identified nearly 300 individuals for screening. Health care providers will conduct the screening at La Plata on Dec. 5 and at Stethem on Dec. 6. Nurses will read the tests two to three days later. Even if the first test is negative, a second test is needed to ensure a person is not infected with TB. The health department expects to conduct the second round of screenings about 12 weeks later, or after the school system’s winter break. The health department provides free TB tests to those people identified.

The school system is working with the health department to ensure there is no further risk at the school or center.

Tuberculosis is a bacterial illness that responds well to proper medical treatment. It is spread through the air, usually by coughing or sneezing. Generally, a person must have prolonged exposure to the person with TB in order to breathe in a sufficient number of TB germs to cause a TB infection. The disease cannot be transmitted by touching someone or by sharing eating utensils.

Questions about TB or health concerns should be directed to your family physician or the Charles County Department of Health’s Communicable Disease Control Program at 301-609-6900, ext. 6025, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additional information about tuberculosis is available on the Department of Health website www.charlescountyhealth.org. A fact sheet is also available on the school system website at www.ccboe.com.

About CCPS

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 caring community schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

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Charles County Public Schools (CCPS) is accepting nominations for The Washington Post’s 2017 Teacher of the Year Award. The annual award honors exemplary teachers who demonstrate excellence in teaching and outstanding leadership, encourage creative and quality instruction, and contribute in a substantive way to the improvement of education.

One finalist in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area will be selected as The Washington Post Teacher of the Year. Charles County Public Schools’ finalist will represent Charles County and be in the running for The Post’s overall award. Nominees must be full-time teachers in grades prekindergarten through 12 and have a minimum of five years teaching experience; three of those years must have been with Charles County Public Schools.

Teachers, students, former students, administrators or community members may submit nominations. Teachers may not nominate themselves. Nominees must also maintain their teaching position throughout the 2017-18 school year.

Nomination materials include a minimum of four statements of support, one of which must be from a professional educator; a career summary (list of positions held, date and location of each, and degrees and certifications earned); a description of contributions in each of the nomination criteria categories; and a 200-word biography written to highlight the specific award for which the awardee was nominated.

The nomination criteria categories are:

• instill in students a desire to learn and achieve;
• understand the individual needs of students, encourage their talents and foster their self-esteem;
• demonstrate a thorough knowledge of subject matter and the ability to share it effectively with students;
• foster cooperative relationships with their colleagues and the community;
• demonstrate outstanding leadership; and
• maintain their teaching position throughout the 2017-18 school year.

Charles County’s finalist for The Post’s Teacher of the Year awards program will be recognized by The Post with other finalists from school districts in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia.

Nomination materials must be included in a presentation binder that does not exceed 100 single pages. Included in the binder should be one color laser print of a vertical headshot photograph of the nominee. The photo should also be downloaded to a disc as 3-by-5-inch jpeg file with a minimum resolution of 300 dots per inch (dpi).

Nominations are due by Wednesday, Jan. 4. Binders should be sent to Ramona DiBenedetto, Office of Human Resources, Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, Md., 20646. Binders must include a completed cover page. The cover page, as well as other supporting materials, is posted on the school system website at http://www.ccboe.com/jobs/emprec.php.

The winner will be selected by a screening committee and kept confidential until The Washington Post runs its advertisement to announce the recipient. Contact DiBenedetto at 301-934-7242 or rdibenedetto@ccboe.com with questions.

The Washington Post established the Teacher of the Year Award to recognize excellence in teaching, encourage creativity and quality instruction and to contribute in a substantive way to the improvement of education in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area.

About CCPS
Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event.

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The Charles County Department of Health has confirmed that an individual at La Plata High School has been diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB) disease. The school system is working with the health department to ensure there is no further risk in the school.

Tuberculosis is a bacterial illness that responds well to proper medical treatment. It is spread through the air, usually by coughing or sneezing. Generally, a person must have prolonged exposure to the person with TB in order to breathe in a sufficient number of TB germs to cause a TB infection. The disease cannot be transmitted by touching someone or by sharing eating utensils.

The health department is working with the school and school system to identify those who should receive TB testing. Students, teachers and staff members at La Plata who may have had prolonged exposure to the individual diagnosed with TB will receive an exposure letter and a TB testing consent form by email and regular mail early next week. The health department will provide free TB tests at La Plata to those people identified. La Plata parents/guardians, who do not receive an exposure letter or e-mail, do not need to have their children tested at this time.

Yesterday, La Plata emailed and mailed an information letter home to all parents. Questions can be directed to your family physician or the Charles County Department of Health’s Communicable Disease Control Program at 301-609-6900, ext. 6025, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Additional information about tuberculosis is available on the Department of Health website www.charlescountyhealth.org. A fact sheet is also available on the school system website at www.ccboe.com.

About CCPS

Charles County Public Schools provides 26,400 students in grades prekindergarten through 12 with an academically challenging education. Located in Southern Maryland, Charles County Public Schools has 36 caring community schools that offer a technologically advanced, progressive and high quality education that builds character, equips for leadership and prepares students for life, careers and higher education.

The Charles County public school system does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, age or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. For inquiries, please contact Dr. Patricia Vaira, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 Coordinator (students) or Pamela K. Murphy, Title IX/ADA/Section 504 coordinator (employees/ adults), at Charles County Public Schools, Jesse L. Starkey Administration Building, P.O. Box 2770, La Plata, MD 20646; 301-932-6610/301-870-3814. For special accommodations call 301-934-7230 or TDD 1-800-735-2258 two weeks prior to the event. 

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